Understanding the new blood test that could detect 8 types of cancer

This innovative test would identify the disease early and before symptoms are shown

Understanding the new blood test that could detect 8 types of cancer

Cancer is the second cause of death in the world. Almost one in six deaths is caused by this disease that affects different organs of the body and according to data presented by the World Health Organization (WHO), it is estimated that in the next 20 years this figure will increase by 70%.

 

That's why a new blood test that promises to diagnose early eight of the most common types of cancer, has become a hopeful breakthrough to save lives. It is a method developed by a team at John Hopkins University in Maryland, USA, which can detect cancer before symptoms occur in the patient and when the malignant tumor can still be removed by surgery. The blood test was tried on 1,005 patients with cancer and had a success rate of 70% identifying ovarian cancer, liver, stomach, colon, lung, breast, pancreas and esophagus in patients where the disease had not yet spread to the tissues.

 

-The blood test was tried on 1,005 patients with cancer and had a success rate of 70%-

 

How does the test work?

 

The novel test that promises to detect eight types of cancer, traces proteins in the blood that are expelled by tumors and seeks alterations in 16 genes. The test will enter a second phase of observation, where this time will be tested in people who have not been diagnosed with the disease and it is estimated that the new blood test will be valued at about $500 per patient.

 

-It is estimated that the new blood test will be valued at about $500 USD-

 

According to the WHO, between 30% and 50% of cancer types can be avoided, if the risk factors are reduced or if the desease is detected at an early stage. However, cancer of the liver, pancreas, esophagus, stomach and ovary are difficult to detect early, since they do not have screening tests and their symptoms begin to manifest themselves when the disease has already advanced. Pancreatic cancer is particularly one of the most difficult to detect and, according to experts, four out of five patients die one year after being the diagnosis of the disease.

 

-60% of new cases of cancer occur in Asia, Africa and Central and South America, areas where health systems and early detection programs are often precarious.-

 

The WHO reports indicate that 8.2 million people die each year in the world as a result of some type of cancer and by 2016 there were already more than 32 million people suffering from this disease globally. 60% of new cases of cancer occur in Asia, Africa and Central and South America, areas where health systems and early detection programs are often precarious.

 


Latin American Post | Krishna Jaramillo

Copy edited by Laura Rocha Rueda

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