Our Opinion

Better Together

The Pacific Alliance is achieving significant results. Three years ago, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru decided to move toward deeper economic and commercial integration. The effort was based on our common belief that the free movement of people, goods, services and capital can help us achieve greater welfare and social inclusion for our citizens.

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More Opinion

Latam may do better than it seems

The International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have just released pretty grim economic forecasts for Latin America in 2015. But the truth is, only three big countries will do badly — and the rest of the region will do pretty well.

Other Opinion

Challenger would change Brazil’s ties with region’s left

If opposition candidate Aecio Neves wins Brazil’s Oct. 26 runoff election — a possibility that virtually no pollster is ruling out — South America’s biggest country would “de-politicize” its foreign policy and end 12 years of preferential ties with Venezuela, Argentina and other leftist governments, top aides to Neves say.

ideas

Giant crocodile fossil discovered in northern Colombia

Scientists in northern Colombia have discovered the fossilized remains of a nearly 900-pound crocodile that roamed the earth 65 million years ago.

Spotlight

The travails of ALBA

The more successful of Latin America’s populists have become more pragmatic

Editor's Pick

Beware a Leftist Landslide in Bolivia

Bolivia's President Evo Morales has gone on record saying he aims to win reelection  with 74 percent of the popular vote. Whether that was a prediction or an order, he didn't say. Yet even Morales's harshest detractors allow that the only doubt about the Oct. 12 election is the size of his landslide.

Read:http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-10-10/beware-a-leftist-landslide-in-bolivia

Animal Whose Numbers Please No One

While hunting the animal here is legal, the culling of Tierra del Fuego’s guanaco herds is setting off a fierce debate over the fragile recovery of a native species and the sway of powerful ranching and logging interests, which contend that rising numbers of guanacos are competing with sheep for pasture and foraging in commercial hardwood
forests.

Read:http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/26/world/americas/in-chile-a-fight-over-guanaco-hunting.html?ref=americas