Peru: Celebrating independence in style

Each year, on July 28th and 29th, Peruvians gather to celebrate one more year of the independence of their country

Peru independence

July finds Peru in the mood to party, dressed in red and white, with joy in the air; it is the month of national celebrations. On July 28th, the declaration of Independence of Lima is commemorated and on July 29th, the Armed Forces and the National Police are celebrated.

How do Peruvians celebrate national holidays?

As in most Latin American countries, watching the military parade is a yearly activity, whether on TV or going to Avenida Brazil which is where the event takes place. It is a family event that offers emotional support to the nation, as well as listening to the presidential speech, which corresponds this year to Pedro Pablo Kuczynski.

Other than the military parade, children and various folk wear costumes, bands play party music, the streets fill with colors, traditional banners, and lots of joy. Every year, in the district of Miraflores, Wong (a Peruvian supermarket) organizes a striking corso that is very popular in the Peruvian society.

Another sacred custom that Peruvians love is putting their flag on everything. They wear it, hang it in their houses, courtyards, and automobiles; they display it in every imaginable way with great pride.

Each district has nocturnal activities during these holidays. One of them is various food festivals; toasting with Pisco Sour cannot fail in any Peruvian celebration. Meanwhile, the “chicha morada”, a very sweet drink made from purple corn, orange, cinnamon and clove is the favorite of children and those who do not drink alcohol. 

Peru is a mainly Catholic country and, for this reason, attending the Te Deum at the Cathedral of Lima is a must for many. Peruvians also enjoy outdoor activities; professional photography shoots in emblematic parks are customary, as well as typical dances and horse shows.

Celebrating the national holidays is essential for Peruvians because they are very patriotic and they are proud of all their customs and traditions.

 

Latin American Post | Daniella Páez Otey

Copy Edited by Susana Cicchetto

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